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Type your paragraph here.The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming  object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. 

Over 7 Million Pounds of Plexiglass was purchased in California last year 

Mercury Disposal Systems Ca Inc.    Tustin  Ca     Contact: 714-505-6100    Copyright © 2015 - 2017     All Rights Reserved

The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 






UNIVERSAL WASTE

We Recycle all your plastic panels FREE OF CHARGE

Drop off at one of our locations or contact us for pick up

Minimum quantities apply for free pickup

WHY RECYCLE PLASTIC PANELS  


MDS RECYCLING is committed to collecting and recycling your plexiglass panels to prevent contaminating landfills in an effort to preserve the environment.  All plexiglass panels we collect are 100% recycled into everyday products.

Type your paragraph here.The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon  uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand. The world has been smacked in the face with plexiglass, or more accurately shielded from other faces. When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the World Health Organization recommended using glass or plastic barriers, plexiglass went from an industrial material to an everyday object.

Restaurants put gleaming new sheets of plastic on takeout pickup windows to protect their tellers. Grocery stores and pharmacies affixed sheets to cash registers. At farmers’ markets, city parks and out on walks in the neighborhood, it’s not uncommon to see at least a few sneeze screens among the hordes of masks. 

According to a store manager of TAP Plastics quoted in a National Public Radio article, a year's supply of the plastic sheets was gone in two months. 

"The whole market just went absolutely crazy," David Smith, the circular economy program lead at Lucite, told GreenBiz. "It was like a sixfold increase in orders." Lucite is an international seller and manufacturer of acrylic plastic products.

According to Marc Tracey, communications lead at Roehm America, the makers of Acrylite and Plexiglas (the brand, not the overarching product), saw demand increase 12 times initially, with things leveling off to five to 10 times its normal demand.